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Everything You Need to Know About the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) in 2023

Introduction to the Integrated National Dental Board Exam (INBDE)

The Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) is a comprehensive dental licensure exam in the United States. It is developed and administered by the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE), which is a part of the American Dental Association (ADA).


The INBDE was launched in 2021 to replace the previous two-part National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) and is intended to assess the competency of dental students in both the biomedical and clinical sciences. The exam is computer-based, taken at Prometric Testing Centers, and consists of two parts: a written section and a clinical section. The written section tests the candidate's knowledge of the biomedical sciences, while the clinical section tests the candidate's ability to diagnose and treat patients.


The INBDE is intended to be taken by students at dental schools who are in their third or fourth year of dental school and about to graduate from dental school or who have recently graduated. It is used by state dental boards to determine whether a candidate is eligible for state licensure to practice dentistry.


Is the INBDE Exam Hard?

The INBDE dental board exam can be challenging, but it is manageable with proper preparation and study tools. The exam is designed to assess a dental student's knowledge and competency in both the biomedical and clinical sciences. It tests a wide range of topics such as oral pathology, dental anatomy, pharmacology, and patient management.


The difficulty level of the exam varies from person to person, and it depends on several factors such as the individual's level of preparedness, study habits, dental school curriculum, and test-taking skills. The exam is comprehensive and requires extensive knowledge of the dental curriculum, so it's important to start studying early and use a variety of study resources to prepare.


To increase your chances of success on the dental board exam, it's important to create a study plan that includes consistent study sessions, practice exams, and review of the key concepts. Additionally, joining a study group or working with a tutor can be helpful in clarifying concepts and discussing difficult topics. We recommend Decoding Dental's INBDE Study Guide for help ensuring you pass the dental board exam.


Overall, the dental board exam is a challenging but manageable exam. With proper preparation and dedication, it is possible to achieve a high score and pass the exam.


How Should I Study For the National Dental Board Exam (INBDE)?

Studying for the Integrated National Dental Board Exam (INBDE) can be a challenging and time-consuming process, but with the right approach and resources, such as the Decoding Dental INBDE Study Program, it is possible to achieve a high score.


Here are 7 tips on how to study for the INBDE Dental Board Exam:


1. Understand the exam format: The INBDE dental board exam covers various dental topics such as oral pathology, anatomy, and microbiology. It is essential to have a clear understanding of the exam format and the topics that are covered on each section.


2. Utilize study resources: Utilize the best and proven study resources, such as the Decoding Dental INBDE course, practice exams, and high yield INBDE questions. Use the Decoding Dental INBDE course to understand the fundamental concepts you will need to know for the dental board exam, and practice exams to familiarize yourself with the format and types of questions.


3. Create a study schedule: Creating a study schedule helps you stay organized and focused. Allocate a specific amount of time each day to study different sections and topics. Stick to your study schedule to ensure that you cover all the material before the exam.


4. Join a study group: Joining a study group with fellow dental students can be helpful in discussing and clarifying concepts. You can share resources, study tips, and practice exams to better prepare for the exam.


5. Practice time management: Time management is crucial during the exam. Practice time management skills when taking practice exams to ensure you complete each section within the allocated time.


6. Take care of yourself: Take care of your mental and physical health by eating healthy, getting enough sleep, and taking breaks during study sessions. Avoid cramming for the exam as it can lead to burnout and anxiety.


Overall, studying for the NBDE requires dedication, consistency, and a strategic approach. Follow these tips to help you prepare effectively for the exam.


When Should I Take the INBDE Dental Exam?

The best time to take the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) depends on several factors, including your dental school curriculum, state licensing requirements, and personal preferences. Here are some things to consider when deciding when to take the INBDE:


1. Dental School Curriculum: Most dental schools recommend that students take the INBDE during their final year of dental school, as the exam covers topics from the entire dental curriculum. However, some dental schools may have different recommendations or requirements, so it's important to check with your dental school's student affairs office or your dental school's advising office.


2. State Licensing Requirements: The INBDE is used by state dental boards to determine whether a candidate is eligible for licensure to practice dentistry. Therefore, it is important to check the licensing requirements in the state where you plan to practice to ensure that you take the INBDE at the appropriate time.


3. Personal Preferences: Some students may prefer to take the INBDE early in their dental school career, such as in the summer or fall after their second year, to help identify areas where they need more study. Others may prefer to take the exam later in their dental school career, such as in the third or fourth year of dental school, when they have more clinical experience. Ultimately, the decision on when to take the INBDE is a personal one and should be based on your individual needs and goals.


4. Residency Requirements: A lot of dental school residency programs that you may be applying to through ADEA PASS want to see a passing score on the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) to evaluate your candidacy for an interview. If applying to a dental school residency program, you would likely want to complete the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) before applying.


In summary, the best time to take the INBDE depends on a variety of factors, including your dental school curriculum, state licensing requirements, personal preferences, and if you're applying to dental school residency programs. It's important to plan ahead and consult with your dental school's advising office and state dental board to ensure that you take the INBDE at the appropriate time.

How Many Dental Board Exams are There?

In the United States, there are two major dental board exams that are used to assess the competency of dental students and candidates for dental licensure. These exams are:


1. National Board Dental Examination (NBDE): The NBDE is a two-part exam that assesses a candidate's knowledge and comprehension of biomedical and dental sciences. Part I of the exam covers basic biomedical sciences, while Part II covers clinical dental subjects. The NBDE is used by most state dental boards as a requirement for licensure.


2. Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE): The INBDE is a comprehensive dental licensure exam that was developed to replace the NBDE. The INBDE is a single, integrated exam that assesses a candidate's knowledge of both the biomedical and clinical sciences.


Both the NBDE and INBDE are developed and administered by the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE), which is a part of the American Dental Association (ADA). The specific requirements for licensure vary by state, but nearly all states accept the INBDE, and recommend the INBDE instead of the NBDE, as of 2021. It's important to check with your state dental board to determine which exam is required for licensure in your state.

What is the Pass Rate for the INBDE Dental Exam?

The Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) is a relatively new dental licensure exam that was first administered in August 2020, so official pass rate statistics are not yet available. However, according to the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE), the INBDE is designed to assess the same competencies as the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE), which has an average pass rate of around 80%.


It's important to note that pass rates for both the NBDE and INBDE can vary depending on factors such as the individual's level of preparedness, study habits, and test-taking skills. Additionally, pass rates can also vary by state, as each state has its own licensing requirements and pass/fail standards.


Overall, while official pass rate statistics for the INBDE are not yet available, it's important to approach the exam with dedication, hard work, and a strong study plan in order to increase your chances of success.


If you failed the INBDE, we strongly encourage you to use Decoding Dental's INBDE study guide, which is what Predenting students have used, with a 100% passing rate as of 2023.

When do INBDE Results Get Released?

According to the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (JCNDE), the official results for the Integrated National Board Dental Examination (INBDE) are typically released to candidates within four to six weeks after the exam administration date.


The JCNDE will email each candidate when their scores are available to view in the "My Account" section of the JCNDE website. Candidates who fail the INBDE will receive a numeric score report, which provides a scaled score, as well as an assessment of their performance in each of the major content areas covered on the exam.


If a candidate does not pass the INBDE, they will receive information on how to retake the exam, as well as resources for additional preparation and study.


It's important to note that the exact timing of score release may vary, and candidates should check with the JCNDE or their dental school for more specific information on score release dates.


If you have any questions or need any help at all, please don't ever hesitate to reach out!


 

About the Author: Andrew Ghadimi

Andrew has served as a member on the AADSAS Advisory Group and the National Pre-Dental Liaison for the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), the same organization that runs the dental school application, ADEA AADSAS. He also served as the California Pre-Dental Chair for the ADEA Council of Students, Residents, and Fellows. Ghadimi was accepted to some of the most competitive dental schools in the world, and matriculated at UCLA's School of Dentistry. He founded Predenting because of his passion for helping other pre-dentals get accepted into their dream dental schools, and his unique admissions knowledge and insider information from working with current and former admissions officers. He has helped 300+ pre-dentals on their journey to dental school over the past 4+ years.


The views, thoughts, and opinions expressed in this article belong solely to the author, and not necessarily to UCLA School of Dentistry, the American Dental Education Association, or any other organization.

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